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Displaying results for the 5 latest resources added by SDB.



The Time of Your Life and Genetics Activity

This activity allows the students to visualize their embryonic development and how they inherit traits from their parents.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Illustration
Discipline: Developmental Biology, Genetics & Heredity
Pedagogical Use: assess, teach
Audience Level: Middle School (Grades 6-8), High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Andrea Kosinski of CABoces
Publisher: CABoces
Date Published: 2014-05-01
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



Culture, Learning, & Developmental Biology

This resource examines the effects of nutritional deficiency on embryogenesis from several perspectives including social, psychological, and developmental biology. This interdisciplinary resource uses a case study as well as links to videos and articles to examine teratogens, fetal origin hypothesis, and cultural impacts on embryogenesis.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Video, Assignment/Activity (Non-Laboratory/Non-Hands on Activity)
Discipline: Developmental Biology, Genetics & Heredity, Human Biology, Reproductive Biology, Embryology
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Dr. Emily Bradshaw of Florida Southern College Biology
Publisher: Florida Southern College Biology
Date Published: 2014-01-02
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



Neural Crest Cells & Facial Development

This resources is designed for an upper level undergraduate developmental biology course. The first section of the resource covers the major regions found in the developing face, the proteins that direct the development of these structures, and implications of protein changes. The second section discusses societal beliefs about facial symmetry and attractiveness as well as cell types that are involved with skeletal structure. Answers to Part 1 questions are attached in the Collection with the same title.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Image, Assignment/Activity (Non-Laboratory/Non-Hands on Activity)
Discipline: Anatomy, Developmental Biology, Genetics & Heredity, Embryology
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), Graduate, Professional (degree program), General Public, Informal Education, Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Dr. Emily Bradshaw of Florida Southern College Biology
Publisher: Florida Southern College Biology
Date Published: 2013-10-18
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



Embryology in Court

Human Embryology in Court is designed to reinforce the principles of embryology. Embryology is a valuable concept that revisits and integrates the principles of animal reproduction, cell communication, cell regulation, cellular metabolism, differentiation, gene regulation, growth, meiosis, and mitosis. The case study is applicable to general biology, environmental science, and human biology courses.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Digital Presentation (Powerpoint), Assignment/Activity (Non-Laboratory/Non-Hands on Activity), Lesson Plan
Discipline: Bioethics, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Environmental sciences, Epidemiology, Human Biology, Pathology, Pharmacology, Physiology, Reproductive Biology, Toxicology, Vertebrate Biology, Public Health, Embryology
Pedagogical Use: assess, learn, teach
Audience Level: High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Dr. Brian R Shmaefsky of Lone Star College - Kingwood Biology
Publisher: Lone Star College - Kingwood Biology
Date Published: 2013-10-06
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



Zebrafish Craniofacial Development

A time-lapsed confocal movie of zebrafish craniofacial development from 30 to 58 hours post-fertilization is shown with anterior to the left and dorsal up. This embryo expresses Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) in the vasculature and cranial neural crest cells, which will generate most of the skull. Cranial neural crest cells populate pharyngeal arches and within these pharyngeal arches morphogenetic movements involved in skull development occur. In the movie, the eye is the structure at the bottom left of the image encircled by GFP-expressing cells. At the beginning of this movie the first pharyngeal arch is located immediately posterior to the eye. This arch moves medial to the eye as the movie progresses. The second pharyngeal arch is immediately posterior to the first. Initially in the movie they are separated dorsally by the first pharyngeal pouch, which appears as a dark gap. In zebrafish, 5 additional pharyngeal arches will be generated more posteriorly, all of which bud off from a common mass of neural crest cells. At the start of the movie 2 of these posterior arches are present; the remainder bud off throughout the movie. These posterior arches move medial to the second arch. References Swartz, M.E., Nguyen, V., McCarthy, N.Q., Eberhart, J.K. Hh signaling regulates patterning and morphogenesis of the pharyngeal arch-derived skeleton. Dev Biol., 2012, 369:65-75.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Short Movies, Video
Discipline: Developmental Biology, Vertebrate Biology
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), Graduate

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Johann Eberhart of University of Texas, Van Nguyen of University of Texas
Publisher: SDB
Date Published: 2013-07-29
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



     
   

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