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Displaying results for the 5 latest resources added by APS.



How to Respond to Inappropriate Invitations

An article written for The Mentoring Forum by Francis Belloni. This article covers various scenarios a trainee or new faculty might encounter; factors to consider when determining how to respond; relevant laws, regulations and policies; and a practical guide for dealing with such requests. In addition to the article there are additional resources, comments, and a Q&A section.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Non-journal Article
Discipline: Career Education/Professional Development
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: PhD Francis L. Belloni of New York Medical College Department of Physiology
Date Published: 2015-09-01
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-29
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education: Chronicling Change, Inspiring the Future

This report highlights the 2013 Vision and Change conference discussions and recommendations, and chronicles many of the accomplishments and challenges biologists and educators nationwide have faced in improving undergraduate biology education. It also synthesizes the road maps participants suggested for accelerating change and moving forward. Examples of programs inspired by the original Vision and Change initiative are highlighted throughout, with additional projects and programs listed in the appendix.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Report, Scientific Standards & Guidelines
Discipline: Education
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: HHMI of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USDA of United States Deparment of Agriculture, Diane Smith
Date Published: 2015-08-19
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-29
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



Cardiovascular Interactions CVI Project (C# Version)

The Cardiovascular Interactions Project is an electronic active learning tool that demonstrates the complex and intricate interactions between the functions of the heart and peripheral circulation to provide an adequate cardiac output during various stresses. These programs are C# programs and require a current Windows operating system (which should include a current version of the .NET framework).

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Classifications


Resource Type: Simulation, Laboratory or Hands-On Activity
Discipline: Cardiology, Physiology, Bioengineering
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: PhD Carl F. Rothe of Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology
Publisher: Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology
Date Published: 2014-06-01
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-29
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



Having it All: Teaching, Research, and Service at a Small Liberal Arts College

This one hour webinar recording by Larissa Williams of Bates College discusses how to succeed as a professor at a small liberal arts college. Objectives: 1. Describe the liberal arts undergraduate teaching and research model 2. Outline the (varied) expectations of liberal arts faculty 3. Delineate the role of toxicologists within this framework and Society of Toxicology resources to meet this end In the United States, small liberal arts schools strive to provide a broad, comprehensive, and residential educational experience to undergraduate students. The job of an academic at a small liberal arts school is to be an excellent teacher-scholar, who excels in both the classroom and laboratory. Additionally, due to the close nature of the college community, service is also an important component. Dr. Williams discussed the challenges and opportunities that exist at a small liberal arts school, especially as it relates to weaving toxicology into both the classroom and laboratory. The panelists elaborated on some of these as well as explaining unique aspects for each.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Webcast
Discipline: Education, Toxicology
Pedagogical Use: teach
Audience Level: Graduate, Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Dr. Larissa M Williams of Bates College Biology Department, Dr. Joshua P Gray of U.S. Coast Guard Academy Science
Publisher: Society of Toxicology
Date Published: 2013-11-19
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-29
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No
Cost Description: Non-profit, non-commerical education users.

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



Glomerular damage can be PhUn!: bringing renal physiology to inner city elementary schools - PhUn Week Poster Session EB2015

We partnered with Teach for America to coordinate visits to 2 inner city Elementary Schools in the Birmingham area. 3 classes of 3rd and 4th grade were visited, with a total of 13 volunteer scientists at different training levels (4 postdoctoral scholars, 3 graduate students, 4 research assistants and 2 research associate) guiding the 2 hands-on activities. Students in each classroom were divided in groups of 6 and given a set of supplies/group: 3 meshes of different pore size representing normal and damaged glomeruli, and a mixture of beads depicting glucose (big) and protein (small). Students had to determine the level of renal damage based on the size of the beads being filtered. In the second activity, 3 artificial urine samples were given to each group. Using urine test strips, students had to determine which sample came from normal, acute kidney injury (positive for protein) or diabetic (positive for protein and glucose) patients. At the end of the activity, the class analyzed the collected data and concluded that the medium pore glomerulus and protein positive urine belonged to an acute kidney injury patient, and that the big pore glomerulus and protein and glucose positive urine came from a diabetic patient. This activity brought basic concepts of renal physiology to Elementary School and gave students the opportunity to interact with scientists from diverse backgrounds for the first time.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Meeting Presentation
Discipline: Education, Nephrology, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Intermediate elementary (Grades 3-5)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Dr. Carmen D De Miguel of University of Alabama at Birmingham Section of Cardio-Renal Physiology and Medicine
Publisher: University of Alabama at Birmingham Section of Cardio-Renal Physiology and Medicine
Date Published: 2015-03-29
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-29
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



     
   

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