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Displaying results for the 5 latest resources added by MSMR.



Smoke Alarm for Your Brain

From our What A Year! series: It is important that people with epilepsy be able to control or manage their condition in order to prevent possible significant harm to themselves.

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Resource Type: Online Tool, Non-journal Article
Discipline: Human Biology, Physiology, Bioengineering
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Date Published: 2015-06-01
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Massachusetts Society for Medical Research



Microscopic Magnets

From our What A Year! series: "Magnetic heating on the micro level is the focus of new research by an interdisciplinary team of scientists led by Dr. P. Jack Hoopes of Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH. It has been known for several decades that tissues with slightly elevated temperatures respond better to radiation and chemotherapy, the mainstays of modern cancer treatments. Dr. HoopesÂ’ research uses nanotechnology to harness magnetic heating on a microscopic scale, producing novel therapies that could be used together with existing cancer treatments."

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Resource Type: Online Tool, Non-journal Article
Discipline: Cell biology, Human Biology, Physiology, Bioengineering
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Date Published: 2015-05-05
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Massachusetts Society for Medical Research



21st-century knitting needles - improving surgical suturing

From our What A Year! series: Dr. Liu is a pediatric surgeon who is currently doing research in microsurgery in Dr. Gary Visner's organ transplantation laboratory at Boston Children's Hospital. Rather than knitting colorful accessories, Dr. Liu uses his needles to sew skin back together. Nevertheless, surgical needles in the 21st century are still modeled after the common knitting needle. The C-shaped surgical knitting needles Dr. Liu uses require two hands to function: one to hold the needle and create the hole for the suture, the other to hold tweezers and pull the suture through. The process can be cumbersome, your hands can get tired, and there is more possibility for tissue damage and human error.

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User Rating: 3 / 5 stars - 5 vote(s).


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Resource Type: Online Tool, Non-journal Article
Discipline: Human Biology, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Date Published: 2015-04-02
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Massachusetts Society for Medical Research



Mind the Gap - filling skeletal gaps

From our What A Year! series: There are plenty of naturally occuring gaps in our skeletal system, like the open spaces surrounding our joints that allow for flexibility and movement. But there are also gaps that are caused by injury or congenital defects that interfere with movement and can be quite painful. New research by Dr. Melissa Grunlan and a team of researchers at Texas A & M University demonstrates novel remedies for filling in these skeletal gaps.

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Resource Type: Online Tool, Non-journal Article
Discipline: Biochemistry, Physiology, Bioengineering
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Date Published: 2015-03-02
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Massachusetts Society for Medical Research



Mighty Mitochondria - TAZ and Barth syndrome

From our What A Year! series: WDid you know that the human body includes over 600 muscles? Muscles are involved in every movement that we make, from breathing to running a marathon. In order to function properly, muscles, like all cells, need energy, which is produced by mitochondria inside the cells. As with all biological processes, though, the production of energy is quite complicated. One missing element can be disastrous. In this month's story, the missing element is the protein, Tafazzin, or TAZ for short

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Classifications


Resource Type: Online Tool, Non-journal Article
Discipline: Biochemistry, Genetics & Heredity, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn, teach
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Date Published: 2015-02-04
Date Added to BEN: 2015-08-26
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Massachusetts Society for Medical Research



     
   

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